Big Kid Books | Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

Me Talk Pretty One DayMe Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

My first foray into the world of David Sedaris was “Exploring Diabetes with Owls”, which is arguably one of his lowest rated books. I, however enjoyed it, and when I saw a kindle daily deal of all his books I decided to grab a bunch. I figured if I enjoyed his low rated book than subsequently his older books would only get better and better for me.

And it seems like my random haul paid off because I really loved this book. I feel like reading this in public would be a great idea for shy people who want more social interaction because strangers will undoubtedly go up to you to ask what has you laughing so loudly.

While at times the writing feels a little overly embellished, for the most part I adored this collection of stories and essays that mostly focused on David’s attempts to learn the french language and his holidays in France. It was hilarious and I can’t tell if it has made me more or less likely to try to attempt learning that language myself in the future.

Overall fun read, loved the bite sized chapters and would recommend this to anyone who enjoys dry and slightly dark humour. 4.5/5

Buy, Borrow or Bin Verdict: Buy

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Year of No Clutter by Eve O. Schaub

Year of No ClutterYear of No Clutter by Eve O. Schaub

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Eve Schaub has a secret room that no one outside of the family is aware of. Always firmly glued shut. Most people, if stumbled upon the room would surely gasp in horror. What does this room contain you may wonder? Dead bodies (well, mostly not), gruesome monstrosities? Well perhaps only to Marie Kondo (famed organizational expert). You see Eve’s aptly named “Hell Room” is packed to the brim with clutter.


“So it goes with my roomful of belongings: most of the objects in there have at one point or another brought me something positive: happiness, joy, satisfaction, or simply a connection to various memories. Collectively, however, they morph into something entirely different:something heavy and obstructing and unclean and mortifying.”

And so begins Eve’s very ambitious project of The Year of No Clutter. Of finally getting through this room and making it livable again. I think the subject of clutter and the fear of letting go of objects is something that so many people can relate to. Eve explains it rather on point when she says
“ Each object was a teeny-tiny reference point to a moment in my life, big or small- like a million stars in the sky, each one connecting in an invisibe line back to me.”

Eve’s Year of No Clutter was an indulgent read for me. How often can we pick up a book that we identify so precisely with? Seemingly every page I was raising my hands in the air going

As a pack rat/clutter prone/sentimental person myself, Eve’s struggles were achingly familiar.

I found The Year of No Clutter to be very well written, with Eve coming across as an authentically personable and humorous friend. I was disappointed that there was no before and after picture at the end . However the author does stress at the end of the book that the story ended up being more about the journey than the destination. Which is perhaps why a before and after picture was omitted.

I also found that while this book was all about a woman’s organizational journey, there was actually not a lot of advice on how to get rid of and reorganize your own personal hell room. This book is definitely more about Eve’s personal journey and growth rather than an actual organizational how-to book. Nevertheless I still got great enjoyment out of it. 4/5


“That’s the whole meaning of life, isn’t it? Trying to find a place for your stuff.”
– George Carlin

Buy, Borrow or Bin Verdict: Buy

Note: I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review.

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Big Kid Books | The Heartfix: An Online Dating Diary by Stella Grey

The Heartfix: An Online Dating DiaryThe Heartfix: An Online Dating Diary by Stella Grey

My rating: 1 of 5 stars
Stella Grey is a fifty something divorcee who is ready to start dating again. Warily she ventures into online dating. This book chronicles her three year long experience. The premise caught my eye right away, I am always interested in books about online relationships and I was curious how online experiences differ by age.

However what I did not consider was how online experiences would differ by personality. Here is where I had a hard time relating to the author, and indeed in a book with a premise such as this it is important that the author be at least a little relatable and sympathetic. It was hard to “ be in her corner” when she came across as so many cliches that are found in online dating, and what many men are accused of labeling online women as…bitter, angry, snobby, obsessive.

I think a small amount of each of these is understandable considering her situation, especially in the beginning of her experience. But the large amount of these qualities tainted the story for me. It was hard to agree that every guy was a classless jerk when in all fairness she herself displayed a lot of unlikable qualities.

There were also a lot of contradictions, for example she complains about one line greetings from men but then she herself does it. She also complains about clinginess in an admirer even though earlier she had practically stalked a man and went on and on about how daily communication was important to her….Of course nobody is perfect, but I have never had much patience for hypocrites. 1.5/5

Buy, Borrow or Bin Verdict: Bin

Note: I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review.

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Hilarious Comic | Adulthood is a Myth: A “Sarah’s Scribbles” Collection by Sarah Andersen

adulthood Goodreads Blurb: Sarah’s Scribbles — casually drawn, perfectly on-point comics by young Brooklyn-based artist Sarah Andersen — confront head-on the horrors, anxiety, and awkwardness of modern adult life. From the agony of holding hands with a gorgeous guy to the yawning pit of hell that is the wifi gone down to the eye-watering pain of eating too-hot pizza because one cannot stand to wait for it to cool down, Sarah fearlessly documents it all. Continue reading